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The Day Gives Us So Many Ways to Eat, Poems by Lindsay Wilson

This haunting collection is as wide and capacious as the West itself.

Sample Poems by Lindsay Wilson

"Lindsay Wilson's The Day Gives Us So Many Ways to Eat is a stunning collection of hunger and loss that peripatetically circles through the austere and magnificently desolate vistas of the American West. In these haunted and haunting poems, Wilson painstakingly unravels legacies of personal and familial trauma, mental illness, addiction, and violence. These are poems that uncouple false binaries of predator and prey, while dismantling generational and geographical heritages of toxic masculinity-the desire to 'aim[. . .] their guns at everything beautiful / they want to bleed.' In this collection, Wilson urges the reader to listen to shame's 'black ringed throat' as a means of offering up a more recuperative sustenance in gorgeously-wrought poems that spiral out like a 'singing rising' from the body." --Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of tsunami vs. the fukushima

"Lindsay Wilson's poems vibrate with blood and hunger, showing us a world that both shivs us and feeds us plums. The Day Gives Us so Many Ways to Eat is a horizon with a mouthful of teeth, as stark and beautiful as the Great Basin, itself. A startling, stirring collection." --Gayle Brandeis, author ofThe Selfless Bliss of the Body and The Art of Misdiagnosis

"In Lindsay Wilson's poems, the miraculous revelation waits within the common things: charred beaks and urns, wild horses and wind, long shadows and the day's dirt on our feet. Assembled as they are from the ruins of America, they shimmer, they sway, they find the beauty in those ruins. These poems know what we do inside the stare of loss' knowledge: name it, and yet, in their wisdom, they feel 'how much of this world [they] cannot name,' and-beautifully, wonderfully, miraculously- they show us that that hopelessness, too, is a song." --Joseph Fasano, author of The Crossing and The Dark Heart of Every Wild Thing